All posts tagged: translations

Results From Our 2016 Customer Satisfaction Survey

Your feedback is really important to us! In the first days of 2017, we analysed the questionnaires and forms completed by our customers online or at our offices.

With every translation project handoff, we ask our customers to fill in a questionnaire and rate the quality of translation services provided by Mitra Translations. We really appreciate and need your feedback so we can improve the quality of our work and meet your high expectations. We want to make sure we offer impeccable services and that makes each and every opinion important to us.

mitraResults From Our 2016 Customer Satisfaction Survey
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Christmas around the world (Part 1)

Christmas is celebrated all over the world every year. And even though there are some common traits in the way people celebrate, the holiday carries the charm of every separate culture and reflects the local traditions and worldview. Read on to find out how people celebrate in different countries.

mitraChristmas around the world (Part 1)
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Black Friday and Translations – What Do They Have in Common?

Black Friday is an American holiday celebrated on the day after Thanksgiving. Though recently, it has travelled all the way across the Atlantic over to Britain, where it has now become an annual phenomenon. And it doesn’t stop there – it’s spreading to other countries as well!

mitraBlack Friday and Translations – What Do They Have in Common?
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Differences between proofreading and linguistic review

Both combine to produce the perfect text

Proofreading and linguistic reviewing are the final dashes in the whole translation process, before the final text is sent to the client.

Sure, they are necessary only when the client has explicitly asked for them, because they are important cogs in the whole translation budgeting process.

If the text includes information from a specific technical field or a literary work, it’s necessary for it to go through both processes. In general, they are expected to be accomplished for the simple reason that it isn’t clear if the translator has had previous experience in the text’s technical field or not, and how he has used certain important terms and interpretations.

In fact, proofreading and linguistic review have a lot in common, but at the same time are completely different, making it necessary to use both of them for a successful translation.

Let us examine what the two processes that assist in making the translated text more precise in fact are, and discover the differences between them.

Proofreading

The usual professional approach: the translation has to be proofread by a person, who hasn’t worked on it.

During the process, the content is accentuated from a lexical standpoint. Grammatical and spelling errors are removed as well.

At best, a proofread is made by a professional translator who is a native speaker. It is no accident that proofreading a text is accepted as the final еditting step before the finalization of the translation.

Proofreading a text is an important step in translation, according to professional standards, translation associations and certifying organizations.

It is good to know what the better the translator is, the less the editor’s work will be.

Our professional advice is: Never underestimate proofreading! Never leave a text without a final check, no matter if it’s tied to a specific industry or not.

 

Linguistic Review

The linguistic review can be perceived as a subprocess of text revision, but in the field of professional translation, it is accepted as a separate one – including evaluation from a professional linguist.

The linguist focuses on the separate words in the text, their meaning and their contextual use – in other words: syntax.

A review includes a check and evaluation of the used words, in accordance with the context and its specifics.

The review is treated as a final revision of the text’s integrity in comparison to the original and the provided guidelines. It includes copy editing, reevaluation and change of the whole text structure, if necessary.

The process of text editing and linguistic evaluation require more time, because they comprise not only of a spell-, a stylistic and a grammar check, but also a thorough check of both the source and target texts.

On the other hand, the two processes contribute to a more precise translation, which means that they cost extra in most translation agencies.

It doesn’t matter if you’re going to examine the proofreading and linguistic review separately or as a single process. They still remain important steps towards the preparation of the perfect translation.

 

According to the quality control requirements included as a standard in Mitra Translations, each translation is proofread before delivery.

With more specific texts and after additional agreements with our clients, the translations go though a linguistic review and evaluation.

 

mitraDifferences between proofreading and linguistic review
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Yes! There Are Famous Translators Out There!

We all know some famous writers Shakespeare, Charlotte Brontë, or contemporary ones, like Dan Brown, Joanne Rowling, and many, many more. But the question we’re asking is – are there any truly famous translators out there? How popular would her books be if there were no translators to share them with the rest of the world?

In fact, there are! Here are some of them!

Lia Wyler – Brazilian Translator

The Harry Potter series of books has been published in over 68 languages. One of the people who contributed to this is Lia Wyler. She translated these novels from English to Brazilian and European Portuguese. Rowling was very generous with her praise for Lia and has personally congratulated her for her creativity when it came to translating the personal names from English to Portuguese. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Lia changes the name of Bob Odgen to Beto Odgen, which is a pet name for Roberto in Portuguese.

In addition to translating this beloved series of novels, Lia also translated famous authors such as Margaret Atwood, Henry Miller, Stephen King and Sylvia Plath.

Lewis Borges – Argentine Writer, Poet and Translator

Lewis Borges is a respected writer in the world of Spanish literature. However, most people don’t know that, in addition to being a writer, he was also an amazing translator. He was a mere 9 years of age when his first translation work got published in a popular Argentina newspaper – a translation of Oscar Wilde’s novel, The Happy Prince,

Throughout his whole life he has translated literature from German, English, Old English, French and Norwegian Norse, to Spanish. Some of the writers he translated are Hermann Hesse, William Faulkner, Rudyard Kipling, Franz Kafka, Virginia Wolf and Edgar Allan Poe.

Gregory Rabassa – Prominent Literary Translator

He is a translator who worked with Portuguese, Spanish and English. He has translated works from Jorge Amado, Julio Cortázar and Gabriel García Márquez. Cortázar was so impressed with his translations that he personally recommended Rabassa to Márquez. It took him 3 years to have One Hundred Years of Solitude, translated. At some point, Márquez shared that, in his opinion, the translation was superior to his Spanish original.

But unlike Márquez, you don’t have to wait for 3 long years for the translation that you need. Contact us today!

mitraYes! There Are Famous Translators Out There!
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Translators vs. Translation Agencies

This discussion is a bit like the age-old question: “Which came first: the chicken or the egg?” Very often freelancers call translation agencies into question. They consider them as nothing more than sales agents. Of course, this is far from being the case. And yet, the client has to make a very important decision: translator or a translation agency? This article is intended to give an answer to that question.

mitraTranslators vs. Translation Agencies
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The importance of formatting for translation

Let’s start with an example which is not uncommon for large companies: the employee responsible for translations often does not fully understand the concept of working with specific content, such as graphics and drawings, for instance. Usually, he or she has to send the documents to a translation agency either as a PDF file or scanned. Most probably the person contacting the translation agency doesn’t know whether to send the translation in a specific format, e.g. INND or QX. It’s quite possible that he or she hasn’t even heard of them.

mitraThe importance of formatting for translation
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