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Translation Services for Business Growth

Growth is priority number one for any business. A good business plan involves different ways to promote productivity. This applies for any business, including translation.

We, at Mitra Translations, are proud that we’re able to adapt our workflow processes, so we can always carry out projects of various sizes and volumes with high quality and speed – translation of documents, website localization, legal and technical documentation, medical translations, etc.

We manage our translation work with great speed – it doesn’t matter if we are dealing with 10,000 or 50,000 words for translation. It is all a matter of coordination and planning. We maintain a rich database of expert translators and we are continuously adding new specialists in order to guarantee quality, efficiency and speed. Our project managers are in regular contact with all contractors and fully control the process, so that we hand off every project with quality and on time.

Growth is very important to us. We grow together with your business. We help you not only to communicate better with your clients, employees and partners in their own language but also to expand your business into new markets and be successful on every single one of them.

Regardless of the size and objectives you pursue, we will provide you with the services you actually need, to make sure your business will get good service, quality and accurate communication that will lead to successful transactions, flawless contracts and translation of important documents, without any ambiguities or errors.

We are your partners in the growth of your business – something we really believe in.

Mitra Translations will help you plan your future business projects. Because we want to grow with you and be both successful and useful!

 

Contact us now and let’s start building new business horizons today!

mitraTranslation Services for Business Growth
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The World’s Newest Language

It might come as no surprise that English is the most popular spoken language in the world. In the past few decades, there’s been a trend for people to learn a foreign language with an American accent which gradually replaces British English as a dominating international language.

However, a new dialect of English is spreading rapidly and has already become popular under the name Globish.

Jean-Paul Nerriere, the French CEO of IBM, introduced the term in 1990.

Is Globish is the new lingua franca?

Globish is an English language without borders. It belittles the importance of grammar and the syntactic structure, avoids confusing idioms and pays attention to the efficiency of communication. Nerriere identified 15000 keywords which help communication between people of different nationalities. According to him, this “new” language is spoken by two billion people worldwide.

It’s interesting what the future of Globish will be. Whether it will assimilate foreign words from various other languages, like lingua franca, or remain closer to the English language? Will people begin to write books or even poetry in Globish? Will there be any movies featuring this language?

Despite the mass widespread of Globish, the international business needs and will continue to depend on professional, high quality translation services. An universal and simple language such as Globish can not capture all the nuances, can not achieve technical precision and recreate specific expressions typical of the unique cultural context of each traditional language. And let’s not forget that although 2 billion people speak Globish, at least five billion people are unable to communicate with each other so easily.

Contact us to learn how we can help you communicate better with business partners around the world.

 

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“Huh?” – the word that needs no translation

 

Translation agencies can do anything but there is at least one word out there that doesn’t need translation.

The simple “huh?” (in Bulgarian we use “A?”) is rarely written down. However, it is used to signal that one either didn’t hear or didn’t understand what was just said is indispensible, especially in informal conversation.

But the interesting thing about “huh?” is that it’s practically universal, according to a study published by researchers from the Max Planck Institute. They studied 31 languages from around the world as diverse as Icelandic, Cha’palaa (a minority language spoken in Ecuador), and Murriny Patha (an Australian Aboriginal language). Their findings were that every language studied uses “huh?” in the same context to mean the same thing.

 Every language needs a “Huh?”

Other common words are often radically different across languages. Consider the English “dog” – “chien” in French, and “gǒu” in Mandarin Chinese. The humble “huh?” is actually an instance of convergent linguistic evolution. Regardless of language family or location, in all conversation we are expected to reply promptly and appropriately to what has just been said. When we are unable to do so – through not hearing or not understanding what has just been said – we need an ‘escape.’ This need to quickly pause the flow of conversation to enable us to better understand and respond imposes a very specific constraints on the “escape” words that evolved.

As a result, we find a word like “Huh?” in every language and it fits the bill perfectly: it is a simple, minimal, quick-to-produce questioning syllable.

Although “Huh?” doesn’t need translation, there are so many other words we can translate. If you need professional translation, contact us now!

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Meet the Interpreters: Four Things You Might Not Know About Them

History has seen situations where people had to deal with more than one language. In translation, however, there are often two faces. Just think of the Italian pun “traduttore, tradittore” (‘translator, traitor’).

Yet people still respect and recognize the skills of the translator as something extraordinary. Few realize, however, how difficult it is to understand and interpret something from one language, while producing the same meaning in a second language.

Susan Sontag says: “Translation is the revenge of intellect upon art. Even more! It is the revenge of intellect upon the world.To interpret is to impoverish, to deplete the world – in order to set up a shadow world of ‘meanings’.”

If you think of it, we can all agree that translators have always been engaged in one of the most important and difficult jobs in the world and definitely deserve respect and recognition for it. Often heard, but rarely seen. Maybe they don’t quite have “a front row seat to history”, but you can guarantee that interpreters are always hidden somewhere in the most significant rooms.

In appreciation of these people who make the remarkable utterly routine, we have compiled a list of four things you might not have known about their lives.

  1. Your intepretator is (most probably) not a translator

The qualifications are different, and the job descriptions barely match. We’re talking about different qualifications here, even job descriptions. One works alone, at home, with a dictionary; the other gains experience from meeting people face to face. Not only do the skills involved differ, but the kinds of people attracted to each profession may be different too. One of the main misconceptions out there is that mastering multiple languages somehow makes you an all-rounded professional. Mastering multiple languages is the (necessary but insufficient) minimum entry grade for either profession. Much like having two hands is probably a minimum requirement for becoming a concert guitarist; ditto for becoming a car mechanic. And here’s the analogy: someone being a professional translator and a professional interpreter is rather like someone being a premier league footballer and a pro tour golfer at the same time*.

*There are, of course, more people who earn money as translators and interpreters than as footballers and golfers. This is an example to show that these people have a unique set of skills.

 

  1. Interpretation is Rich in Content

Different situations call for your interpreters to have a diverse range of skills.

  • Simultaneous Interpreting

Simultaneous interpreting occurs at the time of speaking. It is usually performed by a team of two interpreters. Here, any more than a few seconds lag would disrupt the entire event With this kind of instantaneous, real-time transfer, 30 minutes is considered the absolute maximum time any individual can sustain this feat.

  • Consecutive Interpreting

With consecutive interpreting, the speaker has to leave gaps at the end of a sentence or a conceptual break in their content. In these breaks, the interpreter renders what has just been said into the target language. Events that use consecutive interpreting can take up to twice as long. Someone doing consecutive interpreting may have a few seconds pause to think.

  • Chuchotage

This type of translation is derived from the French verb “chuchoter “which means “to whisper”. Chuchotage involves the interpreter sitting next to the client and performing simultaneous interpretation in hushed tones. It’s best suited for meetings. Too many people in a room doing this for any length of time might result in progressively raised voices and ultimately chaos. Therefore, it’s best suited for shorter meetings in a narrow circle of people. Strictly speaking, the former don’t need to have any interpersonal skills to do their job, whereas the latter couldn’t survive without them.

  • Relay Interpreting

This is an interpretation between two languages via a third one. When a delegate speaks a language that is “unmarked” by the intepreter in the booth, it can be “transferred” (via audio) to another booth which marks the respective language and accepts the function of the active languages booth. The interpreter works via another language without disrupting quality. To understand why relay interpreting is necessary, we just have to imagine the complexity of the situation at the EU. There are 24 official languages, into which every single document must be translated. When it comes to conferences, the same job must be repeated verbally with interpretation. Languages like English and French are far more widely spoken and understood than, say, Maltese and Latvian, and it’s uncontroversial to say that you will have trouble finding many Maltese-Latvian speakers qualified to interpret in either direction. When the delegate from Latvia is to give a presentation about Marine Preservation to a conference, the simplest solution is to find a common language – for example, a Latvian-English interpreter and an English-Maltese interpreter. One will read from Latvian into English for all English speakers. The second one will listen directly to the original speech, but to the rendition provided by the first interpreter. Then the second interpreter will interpret this English version of the speech into Malteese for the Malteese attendees.

Simple, isn’t it?

Except that adding in even another language increases the scale of the challenge, and there are other language-specific obstacles to successful relay interpretation.

 

  1. Your Interpreter is a True Artist

Interpreters are hired for events where there are live audiences. The stakes are very high. Every assignment entails an on-the-spot compromise. Part of the performance comes with striking the balance between preservation of tone and transposition of cultural differences. A speech on a serious subject must have its austere tone transmitted; while a lighthearted, funny delivery poses the ultimate interpreter’s nightmare – spontaneous translation of humour into a different language. Interpreters must have a good feel for what may be funny or polite in one language but dull or shocking in another. Similarly, they have to be attuned to all of the clues that make up a linguistic message – including the slightest hints from body language. One of the more important skills this high-stress job requires is the ability to clamber out of a hole. Even the most skilled linguist can find themselves mid-speech having forgotten a pivotal sentence, or being confronted with an unfamiliar word. In such awkward situations your interpreter’s improvization skills will save the day.

 

  1. Your Interpreter’s Job is Safe

And as much as people would love to find a way of avoiding the interpreter’s fee, the profession is safe for several reasons.

Firstly, more people than ever may be learning major global languages like English, Spanish and Mandarin…But this doesn’t foreshadow a decline of the language service industry. The amount of time, effort and investment that corporations like Google and Microsoft have lashed into automatic translation software is a testament to the growing demand of the global population have access to foreign language content. But there is no such automatic translator that translates a long speech or a difficult content so that it makes sense.

Machine interpretation relies on the synchronisation of two pre-existing, quite shaky technologies – voice recognition followed by automatic translation. The application of speech synthesis is a further stumbling block. Even with recent advances, the best this field can offer falls well short of acceptable standards in voice tone, emphasis and pronunciation. So, it relies on three collaborating levels of automation in which things regularly go wrong.

 

So, next time you work with an interpreter, spare a thought for the human being behind the booth, and remember that you haven’t paid for a computer;

If you need professional interpreting services, we will be happy to respond to your request!

mitraMeet the Interpreters: Four Things You Might Not Know About Them
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Why You Need to Localize SEO and SEM for International Websites?

Just imagine potential customers re searching in their native language and will not even find you in the first page of the search engine results. Is this a reason enough for you?

Studies of consumer behavior show that 3 times as many readers of a website will convert to customers if you give them information in their native language.

You don’t need to translate your legal and privacy info pages, but you do need to translate your important landing pages, selling pages and other valuable, general content.

 NO EYES – NO BUYS.

It’s as simple as that. To avoid this unfortunate outcome, you should really understand how important it is to take advantage of all the features and tools related to searching in different languages.

So let’s talk about how you can stop losing guests before they can even get to your doorstep – all you have to do is localize your SEM campaigns immediately.

The Laws of Attraction

You’ve all probably heard the theory of particles and how they are attracted to or repelled by one another – I hope you paid attention in physics classes. These particle properties are often referred to as the “laws of attraction”. Well, this law also applies when targeting SEO and SEM.

Effectively localized international SEM can lead to more downloads, more sales, more revenue, and even reduced costs in longer term marketing expenditure.

Your SEO and SEM campaigns will get better scores, rankings and click-through rates – and ultimately more sales – when adapted for the searcher’s native language!

What’s more important! International SEM goes beyond simple translation. If the text is not properly adapted to the region and its peculiarities and specifics, it may not resonate well in the relevant market and may even lead to a complete collapse of campaigns!

Hence the need to localize the text using a translation agency, which will not only translate the content but will also advise you, so you really make your breakthrough in the local market.

Some basic truths:

– Just because an English word have a high search volume in Google does not mean that the translation of the word will resonate in another market and another language.

– Just because something is popular on Google.com, it does not necessarily mean it will be just as popular in Google.de, for example.

– In another language, the keyword can get a smaller search volume than a slang expression, for example, if this expression is popular in the relevant foreign culture.

All of this means that keyword optimization in a foreign language can have several different translations to localize the main key phrase.

It should be noted that international SEM doesn’t always mean excluding English completely. The English term “low-cost“ can often be encountered in commercials for travel agencies, for example, in combination with keywords from the native language. Here you will need professional advice from a linguist translator.

Carefully Choose Every Single Sign!

efore investing in a foreign SEM campaign, you should be aware that the number of characters you can use on each line of your PPC (pay-per-click) ad is usually limited. As the number and length of the words are often longer in foreign languages – think German or Finnish for example – resulting translations are likely to exceed the limitations. That‘s why it‘s important for the commercial to be adapted professionally.

Localization will Boost ROI for Global Websites.

Global websites and landing pages are a critical component of the customer‘s “journey“. You can count page views, likes and shares, but to measure translation effectiveness and ROI you’re going to have to determine how well your content resonates with a given audience.

Analyze, for example, why a campaign did well in some markets, but failed to take hold in others.

Translated websites and landing pages lead to higher conversion rates and localized ads will result in better click-rates, which can be easily measured and compared.

Example: after localization, PhraseApp reported higher levels of realization; the localized commercials increase the PPC profit, and they could also be more easily compared and measured.

Contact us now and we will find the best-working solution for you and your business. Let us help you conquer new markets and win!

 

 

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6 Important Moments in The History of Translation

From Babylon to the age of Internet, translators have always played an important role in every significant historical event. Language professionals have allowed different countries to communicate, thus resolving important issues or discussing various topics. But, as we know, words and deeds remain and important intermediaries between them sink into historic nothingness.

 

For this reason, we decided to focus your attention to some important events that have marked the people who are dealing with one of the oldest professions in the world – translation.

 

382

In 382 the pope, Damasus, commissions the leading biblical scholar of the time, St. Jerome, to provide a translation of the Bible and this is how Vulgata was produced – the canonic Latin version of the Bible which is used in the Catholic church.

Today St. Jerome is revered as the patron saint of translators and scholars.

 

1372

When returning to England from Italy where he was sent as an ambassador, Geoffrey Chaucer brought back manuscripts of Dante, Petrarca and Boccaccio.

Chaucer is fluent in two languages: English and French; and although we can not call him a typical translator, he definitely has a major contribution to the fact that his contemporaries got acquainted with the works of the classics.

According to some sources, because of his early literary works and translations, in 1374 Chaucer receives an award from King Edward III – “a gallon of wine a day for the rest of his life.” This means approximately 4 liters and a half – every single day!

 

1519

This year, La Malinche, also known as Dona Marina, was brought to Spain. La Malinche is a translator, a concubine and a confidante of Hernan Cortes. She becomes his translator during the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Before this, she learned different languages, after having been sold into slavery after her father’s death. Being a translator for almost ten years, she is described in popular culture as a traitor, hungry for sex and wealth. We are mentioning this fact because this enduring reputation of La Malinche highlights the complex nature of translation as a liaison between conflicting groups with conflicting objectives.

1535

William Tyndale was arrested and jailed for a year before being executed for heresy. He was a key figure in the Protestant Reformation;  he made a new translation of the Bible and this translation in particular leads to his untimely death. His translation is considered to be the first case of a registered biblical translation in English that draws directly from Hebrew and Greek texts.
1680

The legendary English poet John Dryden promotes the approach in translation theory to distinguish between three types of translation: literal (literally to the text), paraphrased (adhering to the meaning, not the exact wording) and imitation (reconstruction of the text with a creative approach). These formulations originated in Ancient Greece, but Dryden is the one who brings them into the modern theory of translation.

 

1945
The Nuremberg process marks the beginning of simultaneous translation as a standard in diplomatic conferences. During the process translation in four languages is done.

During World War II, time is essential and this leads to the need for translators with headphones and microphones to work in almost real time.

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Is quality or price more important?

You get different offers from translation services some with lower prices, some not. We’re sure you’d love to accept the lowest one; that’s normal. But before you choose, find out how much quality your money will pay for.

mitraIs quality or price more important?
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Translation – Art or Science?

It’s like the age-old question “Which came first? The chicken or the egg?” We often tend to forget that in order to build a fluent and natural text, the translator must have deep knowledge and attention towards the way the words interact, how they sound in reference to one another, how the writing of a word in the context of a specific idea and theme leads to the use of another world, which in turn leads to using a third one and so on.

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What is transcreation?

Translation v.s. Transcreation

Let us see what exactly translation means.

Generally speaking, this is the process of translating what is being said in one language into another. It’s quite obvious and almost anyone would give you that answer. What’s not too obvious is that the translator adds their own skill, judgement and interpretation of the original document.

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